28 Feb '14, 3pm

Blood oxygen levels during exercise at sea level to predict how much your VO2max drops at altitude:

Blood oxygen levels during exercise at sea level to predict how much your VO2max drops at altitude:

The primary point that Chapman makes in his paper is that not everyone responds in the same way to altitude. For one thing, trained athletes with high VO2max are likely to suffer a larger decline (both in absolute and percentage terms) than sedentary people when they go to altitude. There are a number of possible reasons for this. For example, trained athletes have powerful hearts that pump a large volume of blood with each stroke. That means that during exercise (when the heart is beating most quickly), blood is rushing past the lungs so quickly that it may not have a chance to pick up a full load of oxygen. The result is "exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia," (EIAH) a lowering of oxygen levels in the blood that occurs even at sea level in about half of trained athletes. There are also other causes of EIAH: for example, some people run into mechanical limits on the amount...

Full article: http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/predicting-your...

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