28 May '13, 10am

Pacing, fatigue and the brain. Lessons London taught us

A failed performance because we'd reach a critical level of hyperthermia, or energy depletion, or metabolite accumulation (or any other factor, depending on the context of exercise, see slides below) before the finish line. That's called a bad day out, and it happens because performance is ultimately going to be limited by one of more physiological systems. Pacing aims to ensure that this never happens Bodily harm . In theory, it is possible to push so far beyond those performance limits that we run ourselves into physiological trouble. The line for this is higher than it is for performance - we would fail at exercise before our bodies fail, but it does happen. In fact, a really good opinion insight on this has just been written by pacing researchers led by Zig St Clair Gibson and Carl Foster, and it's called "Crawling to the Finish Line: Why do Endurance Runners Collapse?...

Full article: http://www.sportsscientists.com/2013/05/pacing-fatigue-an...

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